speaking English

Sometimes acquaintances notice that I speak the King's English rather than the laidback, Queen's English ("No wut I meen?")-- though the English have not had a King since I've been talking

Dictionaried pronunciation indications are usually the common mean-mode-median dialectic lobe ... but it'd be nice(r) to have the fully delineated pronunciation, enunciation, available as example.... In elementary school, Sacramento, I studied college composition from a booklet on that talent subject, but spoke the local language -including the Sacramento nasal cheese twang-...

Somewhere along the way, adults, seniors, begin to appreciate their language as spoke and written, and ponder and search once-again the true pronunciation, enunciation, grammar, punctuation ... especially in screenwriting, which is a rather archaic business in modern wool clothing only now taking interest in HDDV high definition digital video, that's been on the engineer drawingboards since before 1984 when I started on-paper, pre-Internet, which was itself in-house back in the 1970's ... and I've only recently since 1996 been scripting movies of my articles databases-- so, now it's a daily practice: to "speak" rather than "speek".

THE GENERAL RULE, of the -modern- King's English (as I utilize in my screenplays):

Pronounce it, enunciate it, -don't make it overbearing: just practice clarity of tongue-.

EXAMPLES:

English - eng·lish, not eeng·lish, in·glish, but closer to ang·lish (which may be what it means in tennis: the angles and hooks gained by imposing high spin ... odd that there is a political speak now-called, spin, rather than, English, referring more to the composition and grammar rather than just the pronunciation)

Knowledge - (kgn)ow·(l)·e(dg)e or (gn)ow·(l)·e(dg)e ... the (dg) is not easy: it spans (j) and (gi) which are close enough that the Queen's English says (j)iraffe and (gk)irl instead of (gi)iraffe and (gi)irl ... the (l) is easier but less simple (the French find the English -L- difficult in words like, "law" [loi Fr. (lwa), from loy·al *]), and apparently developed from (dl) (which French splits, de la, the).

* (Just how law-loyal-loi-le(f)t is related to raw-royal-roi-ri(gh)t, is of protolinguistics interest.)

MORE FUN:

n'even - not even ... cf don't, do not; never, not ever; neither, not either; nor, [not] or; none, not one, no one (noone); naught, aught;

AND MORE FUN, the alpha-beta a-b alphabet:

Apparently the alphabet was anciently reconstructed as a ragged rectangle of categorically similar, roughly linguistically similar letters: A two-dimensional taxonomic layer-map (unfolded), barely recognizable, with vowels along one edge--
a b c d
e f g h
i j k l m n
o p q r s t
u v w x y z
a o
e u
i
b p
f v
j
c q
g w
k
d r
h x
l
- s t
- y z
- m n
:which I'd do as: [under construction]
a o
e u
i
b p
f v
j
g q
c w
k
d r
h x
l
- s t
- y z
- m n
a b c d
e f g h
i j k l m n
o p q r s t
u v w x y z

... not altogether accurate today (though non English d-r is; and qu is pronounced qw) ...
... rather than a multidimensional langue-age (tongue-age) sound system ...
m b p - ph w wh
*m - pf v f
d/th
n d t z s
j ch zhsh y - E - i
- A e
ü ə a
ng g ck x x r - o
- q l U -
h - O -
... which itself is about my 26+2-key alphanumerpunctrol entry keyboard design (but which was repacked for the extra c, x, unvoiced phonemes while the nasal and the vowel stand-alone letters are voiced-- it wrapped-behind).

* (cf modern Jewish-Hebrew script appears to have two -M- mem, the -BM- and the -VM-)

The Queen's English "J" is usual (dj).
The King's English "pure" is "pür" not p(you)r".
English "tube" is "tüb" not American "toob".

... [under construction] ...

A premise discovery under the title,

Grand-Admiral Petry
'Majestic Service in a Solar System'
Nuclear Emergency Management

2005 GrandAdmiralPetry@Lanthus.net